Tag Archives: vases

Simple Flower Arrangements & Flea Market Finds

 

Last week I had the privilege to do some floral styling for a video shoot. The photographer we worked with was photo journalist and Pulitzer Prize recipient, Matt Rainey. The images he captured are exquisite and Matt was kind enough to share these photos with me so I could share them with you.

For this assignment, I used simple and elegant thrift store vessels to compliment the freshly cut spring flowers. There’s really no need to spend big buck on vases … let the flowers express themselves.

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Gussied Up Glass Cylinder Vase

Want to know how to dress up a plain glass cylinder vase?  Simply buy some decorative paper from your local craft store or download and print a vintage wallpaper image from the web.  Then cut to size and slide it inside the vase.  Your done!  Obviously this only works when you are arranging dried flowers.  No water needed for this beauty!

This arrangement features craspedia, brunia, thistle, hypericum berry and scabiosa.

Enjoy your weekend!

Bailing Twine Flowers

My friend Kate made yarn pom poms for a wreath (and her cat Fable) and I thought I’d try the same technique but use bailing twine instead to make flowers. I love bailing twine – it’s inexpensive, a roll of it goes a long way, and I use it in a lot of my projects.

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • Bailing twine
  • Florist wire
  • Scissor
  • Your fingers

Here’s how ya do it:

  1. Loosely wrap twine around four fingers starting with your forefinger to your pinky finger. Wrap the twine around your four fingers about 25 times.
  2. Remove the twine from your fingers and twist florist wire in the middle of the flower to bind the center of the flower.
  3. Cut the looped ends with a scissor.
  4. Now simply fluff up the flower to the perfect shape and cut the flower to the desired size.
  5. Done!

I hot glued mine to the ends of twigs but there are countless creative uses for these beauties. Have fun, and happy crafting!

Orchids

Lately I’ve had this urge to experiment with Orchids. Not anything involving lab beakers, chemistry equations or anything dangerous mind you. More like something creative and classy. Speaking of chemistry, did you hear about the chemist who was reading a book about helium? He just couldn’t put it down. One of my dad’s goofy jokes…sorry.

For this experiment you will find all of the ingredients at your local nursery, craft store, or back yard. You’ll need:

  • Orchids
  • Large glass container
  • Potting soil for orchids
  • River rock
  • Sheet moss
  • Sticks
  • Twine

Now for the ‘how to’:

  1. Place a layer of river rocks on the bottom of the container then line the sides with sheet moss. Using clothes pins, clip the moss in place at the top rim of the container to keep it in place.
  2. Fill the vase with orchid potting soil.
  3. Insert the orchids into the soil mixture.
  4. Remove the clothes pins and finish off the creation with more moss to hide the soil.
  5. Stake the orchid flower stems with sticks (I used curly willow branches) and tie them off with some moss secured with twine. PS: the moss/twine suggestion looks much better than the standard orchid clips usually sold with the plant.

Most orchids come with care instructions but my best bit of advice to keep them gorgeous for weeks on end is to keep them out of direct sunlight but in a well-lit area.  Water them once a week by placing three ice cubes (that’s 3 cubes per plant) on the soil.

Recycled Glass Lovelies

Having a slew of vases, jars and chipped & mis-matched goblets stashed around the house has its benefits. Well sometimes… I either transform them into something lovely (hopefully) or they collect dust. Not a fan of the latter, I decided to paint some of my vases and chipped goblets to transform them into these painted vases.

The process is easy and here’s what you’ll need:

  • Liquitex Glossies High Gloss Acrylic Enamel (buy here)
  • Rubbing Alcohol
  • Foam Brush
  • Cotton Balls

Here’s how ya do it:

1.  Collect/hoard glass jars, vases, and goblets.

2.  Thoroughly clean glass with soap and water then using the cotton balls, swab the inside of the vessel with alcohol. The alcohol will remove any last bits of oil or grime and preps the glass to accept the enamel.

3.  Mix the paint. I used three parts white to one part aqua to get that delicious ‘Tiffany Blue’ color.

4.  When the glass is dry, start painting the insides of the vessel using a foam brush. If the opening of the vessel is too small for the brush, you can pour a small amount of paint inside and swish it around. For my long-necked vases, I did exactly that. I then turned them upside down to make sure the paint was thoroughly distributed inside the vase.

5.  Let the paint dry for at least 24 hours. Finally, heat set the glass by placing in a cool oven and bake for 45 minutes at 325 degrees.  Remove the glass after the oven has cooled and your done!

Just lovely!  Happy crafting and enjoy your weekend!

Repurposed Vase Terrariums

Who doesn’t have a generous supply of florist vases tucked away? Some of my collection have been given to me, others I’ve rescued from the trash. My collection was the inspiration for these perfect woodland folly centerpieces.

Armed with only the bounty of my back yard (which by the way is the size of a postage stamp) I created these centerpieces. They also make a unique and creative way to number tables at a wedding or special event.

They are super easy to make. Simply place a one inch layer of stones in the bottom or your container then add about another inch of soil. Now the fun part! Using your imagination, start placing your special back yard finds into the vases like pines, moss, twigs, ferns, tiny clumps of grass. Don’t be afraid to add extra little surprises like eggs or this little deer like I did. If you don’t have access to these items, visit your local nursery of craft store.

Water with a moderate amount of water and don’t place it in direct sunlight. Enjoy, have fun and happy crafting!

Milk Glass Treat Pedestals

Yes, we’re all in Holiday countdown mode right now and looking for quick solutions to our entertaining needs.  Here’s a simple project using items you may (or may not) have lying around the house.

I have loads of milk glass vases.  You see there’s something about the knobby textures and shapes that call my name and cry out, ‘Buy me, buy me!’.  And the fact that there are two humongous antique malls close to work contributes to my crafting insanity.

However thanks to my obsession, I’ve created these easy to make treat pedestals.  Here are the ingredients for this project:

  • Milk glass vases
  • Mismatched plates
  • A permanent bonding adhesive (I used the E-6000 product)
  • Treats

For two of the pedestals (the one on the left and right of the photo below) I turned the milk glass vase upside down and using the adhesive, glued the bottom of the vase to the plate.  Let dry overnight and you have a unique and easy-to-make pedestal.  Load with goodies and PARTY!

I also separated an old globe and placed it on top of a milk glass vase.  If you ask me, this is my favorite.

Happy Holidays and happy crafting!